A Jungian Aesthetic: Art, Active Imagination, and the Creative Process

Tuesday, December 4, 2018  12:30 – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Maria Taveras, LCSW

A hundred years ago, in 1913, when Jung invented active imagination, a female voice from the unconscious said to him that what he was doing was art. Jung disparaged this anima figure as "that aesthetic lady" and protested emphatically: "It is not art!"

In 20th century modern art, there was a famous Freudian aesthetic based on free association – surrealism. Now in the 21st century, especially after the publication of Jung's Red Book, we have an opportunity, for the first time, to develop a Jungian aesthetic based on active imagination. What exactly is the relation between art, active imagination, and the creative process?

Maria Taveras, LCSW, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City and an award-winning sculptor and painter of "Dream Art." Her website is www.jungiantherapy.com.


Information about further upcoming forums will be posted when available.
Please check back soon.

An Archetypal View of Jung’s Typology through the Lens of Astrological Symbolism

5 consecutive Tuesdays, 7:00–8:40pm Beginning November 6

Instructor: Cynthia Poorbaugh, MFA, LP

In a 1911 letter to Freud, Jung wrote how astrology gave him a clue to "core psychological truths" of a patient with whom he was working, and "that the signs of the zodiac are character pictures, in other words libido symbols which depict the typical qualities of the libido at a given moment." Keeping in mind this early interest in astrology, we will begin with an overview of Jung's theory of typology, which he developed between 1913 and 1918 to help him understand the theoretical differences between himself, Freud and Adler in the years following his break with Freud.

Other Jungians have more recently addressed the archetypal level of typology. We will read selections from these writers and explore how Jung's four functions, sensation, feeling, intuition and thinking, relate to theories of character and physiology dating back to ancient Greece-Aristotle's four basic qualities, the four humors, four temperaments, and to the four elements, fundamental to astrology and alchemy: earth, water, fire and air.

We will look at how the interrelated symbols in the natal chart-the planets in the signs-address the nuances and complexity of typology and explain some of the deeper archetypal underpinnings of our conscious orientation. We will examine the natal charts of Freud and Jung, other public figures, and charts you bring to class.

If you are unfamiliar with the basic symbolism of the zodiac and planets, or would like a review from a Jungian perspective, I recommend Clare Martin's Mapping of the Psyche, An Introduction to Psychological Astrology, Vols.1 & 2.
Note: This course is held at 145 East 29th Street, Suite 1A

FACULTY

Gary Brown, LCSW-R, LP, is a Jungian analyst in New York City. He is a supervising analyst on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and former vice president of The New York Association for Analytical Psychology. He is a member of the Foundation's Continuing Education faculty and he was also past president of the Mid Hudson Jung Society. A life-long student and teacher of Buddhism, he is an ordained lay Buddhist priest and a designated Dharma Master.

Harry W. Fogarty, MDiv, PhD, LP, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. He is a faculty member of the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts and a former Lecturer in Psychiatry and Religion at Union Theological Seminary. He has lectured nationally and internationally in the field of Jungian studies.

Suzanne Ironbiter, PhD, has a doctorate in History of Religion from Columbia University and teaches at Western Connecticut State University and SUNY Purchase College. Her writing and teaching explore Indo-Tibetan philosophy and contemplative practice as a basis for artistic culture, spiritual connection, and ecological action. Her poetry collections include How Fish Learn, Devi: Mother of My Mind, and Devi, and her novel The Secret Journey of Issa imagines Jesus' lost years in India.

Cynthia Poorbaugh, MFA, LP, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City and Cold Spring, NY. She is a teacher and supervisor, and has presented papers on art and astrology at psychoanalytic training colloquia and international conferences. She has previously taught for the C.G. Jung Foundation on the relationship between Jung's archetypal theory and astrology, and continues with her research into how astrology illuminates key facets of Jung's theory and the symbolic attitude.

David Rottman, MA is past President of the C.G. Jung Foundation of New York. He is the author of the book The Career as a Path to the Soul. He is a longtime member of the Foundation faculty and has a private practice in New York City.

Maria Taveras, LCSW is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. She has a special interest in dream interpretation and creative process. Her "Dream Art" has been exhibited in New York, London, Cape Town, Montreal, and San Francisco. She is the recipient of two Gradiva Awards from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis for her Dream Art. As a keynote speaker at the 2015 conference of the Moscow Association for Analytical Psychology, she was invited to present a retrospective survey of the Dream Art that she has created over the last 25 years.


General Information

Location

Programs are held at the C.G. Jung Center at 28 East 39th Street, New York City, unless otherwise indicated on this announcement.

Tuition

All 5-week courses are $175 for the general public and $150 for members, unless otherwise specified.
There is an additional $20 materials fee for the Painting the Psyche course.


Registration

The full fee must be paid at time of registration. You may register online (below, using your Amazon account), by mail or fax (use registration form, below), or by telephone: pay with your MasterCard or Visa. Or you can register in person at the C.G. Jung Foundation, Monday-Thursday 10:00 am-5:00 p.m. FAX # 212-953-3989. Seating is limited and early purchase of tickets is strongly recommended.

You can complete your registration online simply by paying through your Amazon account.

(If you pay online please also email to us your name, address, email and the name of the class for which you have paid )

Fall I classes

The Shadow: non-member ($175)

The Shadow: member ($150)

Trauma: non-member ($175)

This class is full.

Trauma: member ($150)

This class is full.

Painting the Psyche: non-member ($200)

Painting the Psyche: member ($170)


Fall II classes

Passion: non-member ($175)

Passion: member ($150)

The Self: non-member ($175)

The Self: member ($150)

Archetypal View of Jung's Typology: non-member ($175)

Archetypal View of Jung's Typology: member ($150)

Registration Form (required for mail-in or fax registrations only)

 

Registration Form - Fall 2018 (PDF format


Refunds

Refunds for continuing education courses, less $15 for administrative services, will be made up to seven days before the first session. There will be no refunds issued after classes have begun. No exceptions will be made. Programs are subject to change without notice.



Intensive Program 1- Spirit, Soul and Psyche

July 9–13, 2018

At the center of Jung’s psychology is the majesty of the image and symbol. His statement that “image is psyche” captures the complex worlds of Spirit, Soul and Psyche. This week we will look at Jung’s sense of creativity and the suggestion that self- creation can be as important as the work of the poet.We will examine Jung’s own struggle with his Spiritualism and Christianity and how this battle took him deep into his psyche and mythology. The week is about finding soul but we will also explore ways to live with a suffering soul during a soulless time. We will also look for meaning in “Bearskin, a fairy tale from the Brothers Grimm,” about a good soldier who becomes lost after returning from war. Psychologically this is about shadow work and navigating our purgatory.

We will conclude the week with an examination of Jung’s early warnings about information and media overload and how he seemed to predict the large and growing Shadow of Technology.


Monday, July 9
9:00– 10:00am
Registration, Welcome and Orientation

10:00 am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm
The Spirit of Creativity

“But what can a man ‘create’ if he doesn’t appear to be a poet? … If you have nothing at all to create, then perhaps you create yourself.” C.G. Jung, CW 11, p. 906

Jung said that there are five innate tendencies (instincts) and the creative impulse is one of them. Creativity is the instinct most akin to the gods, whatever cosmology. Seemingly out of nothing, something is brought forth. In this workshop, we will examine the archetype of creativity: how the gods created and how like them our own creativity is. Participants will have the opportunity to explore and tap into their own creative spirits.

Instructor: Julie Bondanza, PhD


Tuesday, July 10
10:00 am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm
Spiritualism as a Significant Influence in the Origin of Jungian Psychology

In C.G. Jung’s early life he participated in family séances, wrote his doctoral dissertation in search of a medical answer to mediumistic behavior, kept aware of parapsychological research during his career and attended séances well into his fifties. His maternal Spiritualistic influences and his paternal Christian history were a constant struggle for Jung during his life time. Additionally, his religious experiences mediated through the collective unconscious were factors that contributed to Jung’s ongoing search to understand the intersection of spirituality and science. In his quest to unite the spiritual and the scientific, Jung leaned on his experiences with Spiritualism and his mythic life with the dead. This workshop will discuss how the origin of Jungian psychology was influenced by Jung’s exposure to Spiritualism, his descent into the psyche, and his mythic life with the dead.

Instructor: Jane Selinske, EdD, LCSW, NCPsyA-LP, MT-BC


Wednesday, July 11
10:00 am – 12:30 pm & 1:30 – 4:00 pm
Dwelling Imaginally in Soulless Times

“What’s madness but nobility of soul at odds with circumstance?”
Theodore Roethke, In a Dark Time

“Economics are the method: the object is to change the soul”.
Margaret Thatcher’s interview for Sunday Times, May 3, 1981

We are living in times of great disruption: political passions are aflame, internal upheavals have brought nations to the brink of chaos, and the very foundations of our Weltanschauung are shattered… [One] cannot avoid coming to grips with contemporary history, even if one’s very soul shrinks from the political uproar, the lying propaganda, and the jarring speeches of demagogues… [One] has duties as a citizen ….and an obligation to humanity. (C.G. Jung CW10, pp. 177-178.)
From the Preface to the “Essays on the Contemporary Events,” 1946

What we hold close in our imaginal world are not just images and ideas but living bits of soul; when they are spoken, a bit of soul is carried with them. When we tell our tales, we give away our souls.
James Hillman, Myth of Analysis, 186

As screens of our pixelated devices shine ever more brightly, the world is getting darker. As the dazzling cool spirit of digital inventions gains more power, the world is getting warmer. As politics become ever more polarized, the world is getting more terrifying. Jung’s words written in 1946 in reflection on the horrors in Europe during the previous decade resound strangely familiar. When neoliberal politicians implement programs whose aim is to change human soul1 , not only Jungian psychoanalysts, but all citizens need to worry.

How are we to orient ourselves in this confusing world? “And no one knows, ” as Friedrich Hölderlin already noted 200 years ago in his analysis of destitute times. However, whatever we approach we need to approach it with Eros: “Eros…might well be the first condition of all cognition and the quintessence of divinity itself.” [C.G. Jung, MDR, 353] In his Zarathustra Seminars 1934-1939, Jung wrestled with Nietzsche’s challenge of modernity in the background of the rise of the fascism and Nazism in Europe. In his reflection Jung provided the most definite critique of socio-political conditions of the time and the soul’s struggle with it.

I conceive this seminar as a collaborative endeavor. I will provide a set of Jungian poetic ideas and helpful stories that I find inspirational to explore these contemporary issues and we together engage in Conversation. I conceive this conversation, in its etymological Latin sense, as con-versare, to turn together with. So we will be turning around the subject of Dwelling Imaginally in the Soulless World. This turning together is for the sake of conversation, as the third of the many different voices that will contribute to it. Perhaps in this conversing we will contribute a bit or two to the soul-making.

1: One of the favorite expressions of Joseph Stalin “engineer of human soul.” A version of it has been embraced by ideologists of neo-liberalism since 1970’s.

Location: TBA

Instructor: Sylvester Wojtkowski, PhD


Thursday, July 12
10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm
Bearskin: A Fairy Tale from the Brothers Grimm:
A Story about the Value and Meaning of Purgatory as a Place of Healing and Rebirth

Bearskin is a very old story, and as recent as today’s news. It is a fairy tale about a good soldier, one who knows the art and craft of war making. When the war ends he is discharged. His only provision is his gun. He is ill prepared for civilian life, since fighting wars is all he knows. His hard-bitten brothers refuse to help him out. “You are of no use to us,” they say. “Go and make a living for yourself.” Lost in a state of deep despair with no companions except the dark shadows from the war, this soldier, the hero of our story, wanders into a circle of trees within a laid-waste land. Here he teeters on the brink of chaos and near starvation.

Often, as is the case with our hero, in the hour of greatest need, when hope wanes and all seems lost, the god comes. A paraclete, a divine helper, appears. For Odysseus, the paraclete is Athene. For Faust it is Mephistopheles. For Dante it is Virgil. For St. Niklaus von der Flue, a 15h Century Swiss saint, Christ appears to him in a vision, first as a pilgrim carrying a coat. Later in the vision, this pilgrim transforms into Christ wearing a bearskin over his trousers and coat. In the case of our hero, the god appears as a stately man wearing a green coat, and with a cloven hoof for a foot. He makes an offer of help that involves the wearing of a bear’s skin over the helper’s green coat for a purgatorial period of seven years.

Why Bearskin? From a Jungian perspective, Bearskin helps us visualize and understand the psychological structures that shape the process Jung called individuation. These psychological structures include purgation and deep shadow work. In Bearskin we have a rich, full description of psychological purgatory, its value and meaning, its cost, and its promise. Purgatory is deep shadow work— an extended involutional state of intense introversion when one encounters and integrates dark places in one’s soul, body, and even one’s social world. In order to sustain ourselves and endure we need a map—Psyche’s road map—such as Jung describes: leaving the “collective,” entering involutional, purgatorial states for incubation (sometimes called the wilderness or wasteland), encountering the dark face of the mystery (the instinctive god within), transubstantiation, transformation, and integration on the level of the psyche (the treasure hard to attain), and the “return”.

During our seminar we will move slowly through Bearskin, and amplify the images as we go along. We will describe some ancient purgatorial rites and rituals, see how this fairy tale follows the pattern of cleansing, healing and rebirth well known to ancient peoples and indigenous societies, and draw on C. G. Jung’s descriptions of such states he described in his methodology. Such rites of passage were practiced in the great healing centers in ancient Greece, in shamanic based cultures such as those described by Black Elk, Oglala Lakota holy man of the 20th Century, by European alchemists during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and they are visible in the visions of St. Niklaus of Switzerland. Today we may find these same archetypal images arising in our dreams during analysis, as Psyche and Self encourage the soul toward individuation and wholeness.

Instructor: Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW

Student Dinner 5:00 – 7:00 pm:


Friday July 13
10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm
The Spirit in the Net: Jung’s reflections on the effects of media and technology on the psyche

Information overload, crazy-busy, and 24/7 connectivity are ubiquitous subjects in today’s media, yet “Generalized Media Disorder” is not yet entered in the official Diagnosis Manual. Jung was sensitive to the technological transformations happening around him, yet his voice is rarely heard outside of Jungian circles in discussions related to the subject of the psychological effects of electronic media technologies. In “The Effect of Technology on the Human Psyche,” he addresses his concerns, which he admits are “not at all easy to answer,” and in a recorded message sent to the Analytical Psychology Club of NY in 1952, he expressed his uneasiness about committing spoken words to tape. We will listen to Jung and discuss his thoughts on the effects of media on our behavior patterns and personality.

Instructor: Royce Froehlich, PhD, MDiv, LCSW-R


Summer Study 2018
Faculty

Julie Bondanza, PhD, is a Jungian analyst and licensed psychologist in private practice in the Metropolitan Washington DC area. She is Vice President of the C.G. Jung Foundation and a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she is member of the teaching faculty and past Curriculum chair. She is also on the faculty of The Interregional Society of Jungian Analysts, for whom she has frequently taught. She is a member of the Jungian Analysts of Washington Association, where she is a past Director of Education and where she is a frequent instructor.

Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW, , is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Falls Church, Virginia. She is a clinician, cultural anthropologist, artist, and storyteller. She teaches courses in mythology, fairy tales, Shakespeare, the Greek Classics, and the writing of C.G. Jung. She also leads contemplative retreats, and conducts study tours in Crete. She holds a Masters of Social Work from Catholic University, a Doctorate Degree in American Studies from the University of Maryland, and a certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute in Mystic, Connecticut.

Royce Froehlich, PhD, MDiv, LCSW-R, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in NYC. He is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University, The New School for Social Research, and the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. He holds a doctorate in media studies, and masters’ degrees in theology and social work. Formerly an audio engineer at ABC Radio Networks, now, along with his private psychotherapeutic practice, he is an instructor, supervisor and training analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York.

Paula Howie, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT, HLM, worked for 25 years treating trauma at The Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She is a certified trainer for the ITT approach and uses it frequently in her outpatient practice. She is Past President and Honorary Life Member of the American Art Therapy Association, and currently lectures at Florida State University and School of the Visual Arts. In addition to numerous articles, she has edited two books, the latest of which is Art Therapy with Military and Veteran Populations. She is also an avid watercolor painter.

Heide M. Kolb, MA, LCSW, NCPsyA, is a Jungian analyst and licensed clinical social worker in private practice in New York City and Woodstock, NY. She has been in practice for over 20 years. She is a member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and a graduate of the University of Salzburg, New York University’s School of Social Work and the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. She lectures and teaches widely on Jungian thought and practice and has served on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Foundation, the Jung Institute, and the Blanton-Peale Institute.

Ronnie Landau, MA, LPC, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Philadelphia. She is a senior training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She is the past President of PAJA and is currently Director of Training. She is also the past Secretary on the Executive Board of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. Ms. Landau has taught and lectured on dream theory throughout the United States. She has also taught Transference-Countertransference dynamics in analysis throughout the US as well as Zurich, Switzerland along with “The Holocaust: Through a Jungian Perspective.”

Erica Lorentz, MEd, LPC, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a training analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston where she has served on the Training Board. She has been an adjunct faculty member at Antioch New England Graduate School of Professional Psychology, a training analyst with the Inter-regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and she has been featured on Pacifica Radio. One of her areas of expertise is working with the body in analysis. At the Ghost Ranch Jung conferences in NM (1988-1991), she led Jungian Movement workshops for candidates and analysts. In 2014, she presented at the Creativity and Madness conference in Santa Fe, NM. Since 1986 she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada. Presently she is the president of the Jung Association of Western Massachusetts and has a private practice in Amherst, MA.

Jane Selinske, EdD, LCSW, NCPsyA-LP, MT-BC, is a licensed Jungian analyst in private practice, a practitioner of Mandala Assessment, and a Board Certified Music Therapist. She is past Vice President, Director of Training and Coordinator of the Referral Service at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she is a faculty member and current Chairperson of the Thesis Committee. She is President of the Board of the C.G. Jung Foundation and on the Editorial Advisory Board of Quadrant: The Journal of the C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology. She is also a faculty member at the Institute for Expressive Analysis, New York, NY.

Sylvester Wojtkowski, PhD, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. He is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the New School. He gives workshops throughout the country on the Jungian and Archetypal Psychology topics and has presented at several national and International (IAAP) conferences on Analytical Psychology. His recent publications include “Deconstructing the Monstrous” in Archetypal Psychologies, ed. Stanton Marlan; “Marriage of Madness and Reason—The Red Book and the Invention of Active Imagination,” IAAP Congress in Copenhagen, 2013; and “Seeing Writing on the Wall—Art of Banksy and the Spirit of the Times,” IAAP Congress in Kyoto, 2016.


TUITION
Intensive Program 1: Spirit, Soul and Psyche
Price per person: $975

(plus $95 Foundation membership fee for non-members)

Intensive Program 2: Trauma, Healing and Meaning
Price per person: $975

( plus $95 Foundation membership fee for non-members)


Download the Workshop Registration Form
Use this Form for Mail-In or Fax Registration


Please note that there is a 10% discount on the tuition fee for those who register in advance for both Intensive Programs.

There are no scholarships or auditor or work-study positions available for these programs and there is no single-course registration.

Program is subject to change without notice.

For those registrants who require lodging, please call the C.G. Jung Foundation at (212) 697-6430 for more information.

The above cost will include:

    Costs will not include:
    • Air and ground transportation
    • Meals (except as noted above)
    • Individual sightseeing, individual expenses or any item not listed as inclusive with the program
    • Hotel fees

    Tax Deductions

    Seminars of this type usually meet the requirements for IRS tax deduction, but each individual must consult with a professional tax advisor prior to registration to ascertain eligibility.

    Program Registration

    To pay online click here

    To pay by mail: print and return the registration form (you may need to download Adobe Reader – see below) with your deposit check of $350 per person per session made payable to the C.G. Jung Foundation, or with your credit card information. Your deposit will be considered an entry of payment toward the total program cost.

    The balance of your payment is due no later than July 5, 2018. The right is reserved by the sponsoring organization to cancel the program with refund of applicable program cost.

    Cancellation of Registration

    There will be a cancellation fee of $200 per person on all cancellations received on or before July 5, 2018.No refunds after July 5, 2018. Only cancellations made in writing will be deemed valid..

    Disclaimer of Responsibility

    By registering for this program, the seminar member specifically waives any and all claims of action against the C.G. Jung Foundation and its staff for damages, loss, injury, accident, or death due to negligence on the part of any organization or employee providing services included in this Summer Study Program.

    For more information, call or write:

    Janet M. Careswell, PhM, Executive Director
    The C.G. Jung Foundation of New York
    28 East 39th Street
    New York, New York 10016
    Telephone: (212) 697-6430, Fax: (212) 953-3989
    Email: cgjungny@aol.com
    Web address: www.cgjungny.org

    Like us @facebook.com/cgjungny
    Follow us @twitter.com/cgjungny

Intensive Program 2- Trauma, Healing and Meaning

July 16 – 20, 2018
The word trauma speaks volumes, conjuring up images of wounding, pain, disassociation and displacement. And trauma is pain and promise. Jung reminds us that confronting the trauma and engaging in forthright shadow work, is the beginning of healing. This is the landscape we will explore during this week.

We will explore the research on trauma and how this wounding exists on a continuum from life as trauma to PTSD. We will examine the relationship between trauma and creativity and the power inherent in disassociation. We will conclude the week with an introductory look at Intensive Trauma Therapy.


Monday, July 16

9:00 – 10:00am
Registration, Welcome and Orientation
10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm

Trauma: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

“Filling the conscious mind with ideal conceptions is a characteristic feature of Western theosophy, but not the confrontation with the shadow and the world of darkness. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.” C.G. Jung, CW 13, p. 335

In this workshop, we will explore the archetypal and historical roots of our understanding of trauma. We will also look at some of the recent scientific research on trauma, including brain research and the development of epigenetics and its effect on intergenerational trauma.

Instructor: Julie Bondanza, PhD


Tuesday, July 17

10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm

Trauma, Horses and Healing

In this seminar, we will start by exploring some of the various types of traumas the human psyche can endure, from life itself being a traumatic event, such as the traumatic quality of what the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan called “The Real,” to very specific shattering events in a person’s life that can result in the suffering and symptomatology commonly suffered in PTSD.

We will then focus on the relationship between trauma and the horse, exploring the horse both as an ancient symbol of psychic energy and healing as well as the concrete reality of this majestic animal that has carried humans on its back for thousands of years. We will venture into Greek mythology and explore the myth of Chiron, the revered and powerful centaur who taught the healing arts to Asclepius. Lastly, we will spend time on looking into the many ways horses have become a transforming factor in many therapeutic endeavors from working with veterans and prisoners to victims of domestic abuse as well as to a growing number of individuals whose trauma may be more hidden to the eye.

Throughout the seminar we will examine the material through a Jungian lens and keep it as close and as relevant as possible for each participant.

Participants should bring a journal for your personal reflections.
Location: TBA

Instructor: Heide Kolb, LCSW, NCPsyA


Wednesday, July 18

10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm

Echoes from the Holocaust: Trauma and Recovery through a Jungian Perspective

The catastrophic events of the Second World War had deep and profound reverberations on Carl Jung’s notions of collective shadow and collective trauma. We will discuss Jung’s reflections on the war, the theoretical development of trauma, the trauma complex, and its inter-generational nature. Case material will be included.

Instructor: Ronnie Landau, MA, LPC


Thursday, July 19

10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm

Working on the Edge: Healing Through the Imaginal Realm

In this workshop, we will discuss moving from the edge of trauma and fear of “madness” to the true self. Dissociated memory is stored in the somatic unconscious as affective and energetic states. Archetypal reality amplifies personal experiences, which become confused. While all these somatic experiences have been observed since the beginning of time, they are often pathologized and little understood as a part of healing and transformation. The creative work needed to heal this traumatic split between the psyche and soma involves a conscious dialogue with the unconscious which Jung called active imagination. Case material and video clips will illustrate working with these archetypal states. The morning will explore the active imagination process and the afternoon will describe the manifestations of archetypal and somatic reality in trauma.

Participants are encouraged before the workshop to watch: My Stroke of Insight – Jill Bolte Taylor on ted.com, and either Horse Boy or Temple Granden

Instructor: Erica Lorentz, MEd, LPC

Student Dinner: 5:00 – 7:00 pm


Friday, July 20

10:00am – 12:30 pm, & 1:30 – 4:00 pm

Introduction to the Intensive Trauma Therapy Approach

This will be an introductory session on the Intensive Trauma Therapy (ITT) approach. The ITT intervention is an art-focused approach to trauma symptoms. It is designed to treat the common clusters of trauma-based problems, including eliminating intrusive and arousal symptoms, and reducing avoidance and numbing symptoms. It was formulated by Drs. Linda Gantt and Louis Tinnin (Tinnin & Gantt, 2013) from their early work in the 1980’s. The presentation will cover the theoretical basis of the approach and include an experiential portion.

Instructor: Paula Howie, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT, HLM


 

Summer Study 2018
Faculty

Julie Bondanza, PhD, is a Jungian analyst and licensed psychologist in private practice in the Metropolitan Washington DC area. She is Vice President of the C.G. Jung Foundation and a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she is member of the teaching faculty and past Curriculum chair. She is also on the faculty of The Interregional Society of Jungian Analysts, for whom she has frequently taught. She is a member of the Jungian Analysts of Washington Association, where she is a past Director of Education and where she is a frequent instructor.

Bonnie L. Damron, PhD, LCSW, , is a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist in private practice in Falls Church, Virginia. She is a clinician, cultural anthropologist, artist, and storyteller. She teaches courses in mythology, fairy tales, Shakespeare, the Greek Classics, and the writing of C.G. Jung. She also leads contemplative retreats, and conducts study tours in Crete. She holds a Masters of Social Work from Catholic University, a Doctorate Degree in American Studies from the University of Maryland, and a certificate as an Archetypal Pattern Analyst from the Assisi Institute in Mystic, Connecticut.

Royce Froehlich, PhD, MDiv, LCSW-R, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in NYC. He is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University, The New School for Social Research, and the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. He holds a doctorate in media studies, and masters’ degrees in theology and social work. Formerly an audio engineer at ABC Radio Networks, now, along with his private psychotherapeutic practice, he is an instructor, supervisor and training analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York.

Paula Howie, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT, HLM, worked for 25 years treating trauma at The Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. She is a certified trainer for the ITT approach and uses it frequently in her outpatient practice. She is Past President and Honorary Life Member of the American Art Therapy Association, and currently lectures at Florida State University and School of the Visual Arts. In addition to numerous articles, she has edited two books, the latest of which is Art Therapy with Military and Veteran Populations. She is also an avid watercolor painter.

Heide M. Kolb, MA, LCSW, NCPsyA, is a Jungian analyst and licensed clinical social worker in private practice in New York City and Woodstock, NY. She has been in practice for over 20 years. She is a member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and a graduate of the University of Salzburg, New York University’s School of Social Work and the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. She lectures and teaches widely on Jungian thought and practice and has served on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Foundation, the Jung Institute, and the Blanton-Peale Institute.

Ronnie Landau, MA, LPC, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Philadelphia. She is a senior training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts. She is the past President of PAJA and is currently Director of Training. She is also the past Secretary on the Executive Board of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. Ms. Landau has taught and lectured on dream theory throughout the United States. She has also taught Transference-Countertransference dynamics in analysis throughout the US as well as Zurich, Switzerland along with “The Holocaust: Through a Jungian Perspective.”

Erica Lorentz, MEd, LPC, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) is a training analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston where she has served on the Training Board. She has been an adjunct faculty member at Antioch New England Graduate School of Professional Psychology, a training analyst with the Inter-regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and she has been featured on Pacifica Radio. One of her areas of expertise is working with the body in analysis. At the Ghost Ranch Jung conferences in NM (1988-1991), she led Jungian Movement workshops for candidates and analysts. In 2014, she presented at the Creativity and Madness conference in Santa Fe, NM. Since 1986 she has lectured and taught workshops in the US and Canada. Presently she is the president of the Jung Association of Western Massachusetts and has a private practice in Amherst, MA.

Jane Selinske, EdD, LCSW, NCPsyA-LP, MT-BC, is a licensed Jungian analyst in private practice, a practitioner of Mandala Assessment, and a Board Certified Music Therapist. She is past Vice President, Director of Training and Coordinator of the Referral Service at the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, where she is a faculty member and current Chairperson of the Thesis Committee. She is President of the Board of the C.G. Jung Foundation and on the Editorial Advisory Board of Quadrant: The Journal of the C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology. She is also a faculty member at the Institute for Expressive Analysis, New York, NY.

Sylvester Wojtkowski, PhD, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. He is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the New School. He gives workshops throughout the country on the Jungian and Archetypal Psychology topics and has presented at several national and International (IAAP) conferences on Analytical Psychology. His recent publications include “Deconstructing the Monstrous” in Archetypal Psychologies, ed. Stanton Marlan; “Marriage of Madness and Reason—The Red Book and the Invention of Active Imagination,” IAAP Congress in Copenhagen, 2013; and “Seeing Writing on the Wall—Art of Banksy and the Spirit of the Times,” IAAP Congress in Kyoto, 2016.


YOU DO NOT NEED A PAYPAL ACCOUNT. HERE IS HOW TO PAY WITH CREDIT CARD: On the Paypal login page, look below login fields for a boxed link that reads PAY WITH DEBIT OR CREDIT CARD.



TUITION
Intensive Program 1: Spirit, Soul and Psyche
Price per person: $975

(plus $95 Foundation membership fee for non-members)

Intensive Program 2: Trauma, Healing and Meaning
Price per person: $975

( plus $95 Foundation membership fee for non-members)


Download the Workshop Registration Form
Use this Form for Mail-In or Fax Registration


Please note that there is a 10% discount on the tuition fee for those who register in advance for both Intensive Programs.

There are no scholarships or auditor or work-study positions available for these programs and there is no single-course registration.

Program is subject to change without notice.

For those registrants who require lodging, please call the C.G. Jung Foundation at (212) 697-6430 for more information.

The above cost will include:

  • All seminars and workshops
  • Use of C.G. Jung Center facilities
  • Foundation membership for one year
  • Continental breakfast provided daily
  • Student Dinner, restaurant TBA
  • Certificate of Completion for NYS licensed social workers and psychoanalysts, and creative arts therapists

Costs will not include:

  • Air and ground transportation
  • Meals (except as noted above)
  • Individual sightseeing, individual expenses or any item not listed as inclusive with the program
  • Hotel fees

Tax Deductions

Seminars of this type usually meet the requirements for IRS tax deduction, but each individual must consult with a professional tax advisor prior to registration to ascertain eligibility.

Program Registration

To pay online click here

To pay by mail: print and return the registration form (you may need to download Adobe Reader – see below) with your deposit check of $350 per person per session made payable to the C.G. Jung Foundation, or with your credit card information. Your deposit will be considered an entry of payment toward the total program cost.

The balance of your payment is due no later than July 5, 2018. The right is reserved by the sponsoring organization to cancel the program with refund of applicable program cost.

Cancellation of Registration

There will be a cancellation fee of $200 per person on all cancellations received on or before July 5, 2018.No refunds after July 5, 2018. Only cancellations made in writing will be deemed valid..

Disclaimer of Responsibility

By registering for this program, the seminar member specifically waives any and all claims of action against the C.G. Jung Foundation and its staff for damages, loss, injury, accident, or death due to negligence on the part of any organization or employee providing services included in this Summer Study Program.

For more information, call or write:

Janet M. Careswell, PhM, Executive Director
The C.G. Jung Foundation of New York
28 East 39th Street
New York, New York 10016
Telephone: (212) 697-6430, Fax: (212) 953-3989
Email: cgjungny@aol.com
Web address: www.cgjungny.org

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Falling Apart and Coming Together: Addressing the Pain of Trauma Using Art Based Approaches

Saturday, February 23, 2019   9:30am– 4:30pm
A daylong seminar led by
Paula Howie, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT

Contact hours: 6 CE contact hours for Licensed NYS Social Workers, Psychoanalysts and Creative Arts Therapists for this program.

Carl Jung was said to have worked through his demons in part by using art. In his seminal work, The Red Book, he worked on making sense of his personal journey and on trauma. Art, for many of us, becomes a way of working through psychic and traumatic pain. As we know, trauma affects the psyche, body, and soul and can become a clinical challenge. Addressing it directly may cause the traumatized person to relive the trauma; but not addressing it leaves the person open to reliving and re-experiencing the unmitigated symptoms of the trauma.

This session will focus on the history of trauma with an emphasis on the Intensive Trauma Therapy (ITT) approach created by Drs. Linda Gantt and Louis Tinnin from their work in the 1980s and 1990s. The ITT intervention is an art-focused approach. It is designed to treat the common clusters of trauma-based problems, including eliminating intrusive and arousal symptoms, and reducing avoidance and numbing symptoms without the person reliving the trauma. The presentation will cover the theoretical basis of the approach and will include lecture, personal experiential, and representative case materials.

Tuition
$100 for members/students,
$110 for the general public

Download the 2019 Workshop Registration Form
Use this Form for Mail-In or Fax Registration

You can also pay with Visa or MasterCard by calling our offices at 212-697-6430.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify how trauma manifests itself through non-verbal expression such as pictures, images, and stories
  2. Understand the theoretical underpinnings of the ITT approach and its connection to the ego-resources and defensive inner world of our clients.
  3. Identify parts of the graphic narrative and re-presentation in therapeutic work.
  4. Understand the principle ways to use the ITT intervention to call up resources and ego strengths of the client.
  5. Identify how the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study assists in understanding the sequelae of trauma.

Paula Howie, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LCPAT, HLM, worked for 25 years treating trauma at Walter Reed. She is a certified trainer for the ITT approach. She is Past President and Honorary Life Member of the American Art Therapy Association, and currently lectures at Florida State University. In addition to numerous articles, she has edited two books; her latest is Art Therapy with Military and Veteran Populations. Paula is also an avid watercolor painter.

Contact hours: Six CE contact hours for Licensed NYS Social Workers and Psychoanalysts for this program.

The C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology, Inc., SW CPE, is recognized by New York State Education Department’s State Board of Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0350.

The C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0015.

C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology, Inc. is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists, #CAT-0068.

Saturday, February 23, 2019: 9:30 am–4:30 p.m.
at the C.G. Jung Foundation, 28 East 39th Street, New York City