Early Artistic Expression of Life’s Transitions – Adolescence and Midlife

FIRST TUESDAY FORUM

Tuesday, March 3, 2020
12:30 – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Harmar D. Brereton, MD

Psychologists have long examined life’s transitions, but is it possible that the artist has been examining these events as well, and for much longer?

This presentation will look first at the cave art discovered in The Caves du Volp in the French Pyrenees and the possible relationship with the transformation in adolescence.  In the second half of the presentation, we will examine the Transition of Odysseus through midlife--from The Iliad to his homecoming in The Odyssey.

We will see how these works are small stops on life’s journey and the self-creation of the artist. Both Nietzsche and Jung see art as a forum for self-transformation and healing. In and through art we can deal with our problems and suffering and turn negative emotions into positive, uplifting ones. As he presents it in “The Healing Function of Art,” Jung sees great potential in art’s capacity to heal.

Harmar Brereton, MD, is a medical and radiation oncologist trained at the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins.  He has an undergraduate degree in History from Yale.  He is on the faculty of Weill Cornell Medical School and is a clinical professor of Medicine at Geisinger Commonwealth Medical College. He worked for 10 years with a Jungian analyst and Jesuit priest in the development of his medical practice, and he is now developing a curriculum for medical students that includes the humanities and arts. 

Dr. Brereton taught a course on Homer, The Iliad and The Odyssey in 2018 and on Palaeolithic Cave Painting 2019 at the Schemel Forum for adult education at the University of Scranton.  In 1999 he visited and studied the caves of France and Spain and in 2018 was invited to join the archeological excavation team of “Odysseus Unbound,” which is currently excavating what may be Odysseus’ true home on the Paliki peninsula of the island of Kefalonia.

No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.

The Archetypal Construct: Creative Synthesis in Visual Communication.

FIRST TUESDAY FORUM

February 4, 2020
12:30 – 1:30pm

Speaker: Gusty Lange, MPS, MA, ATR

... for the archetypes are the forms or river-beds along which the current of psychic life has always flowed. C.G. Jung (CW5, p. 228)

The phenomenon releasing origin is spiritual, and with each consciousness ... it becomes more realizable...  J. Gebser (The Ever-Present Origin, p. 542)

The inspiration for Professor Lange’s talk comes from a journey which began in 1979 with her discovery of the work of Carl Jung and the realization that synchronistically there was a connection between Design and Symbolism.  This led to her exploration of the existence of archetypal roots in any corporate identity. There is an unconscious link that designers and visual communicators seldom realize when creating symbols and thus so much is lost or never found in that creative process.  Also in the early ‘80’s, the world was changing radically through the spread of materialism and technocracy and the digital revolution.

This presentation explores these ideas as they relate to archetypal symbolism, basic to the collective unconscious, and to the conunctio.  Vision exists in psyche.  We will also look at how Jean Gebser’s concepts of time, space, consciousness are rooted in the archetypal construct which exists universally from archaic roots and timelessly into the future. Ultimately, this archetypal construct will be seen as inherent in the appearance of the archetypal web, a concrete visual and psychic form, representing the 20th century transiting into the 21st century.

Gusty Lange, MPS (creativity development), MS (Communications Design), ATR, Professor, CCE, Pratt Institute, Graduate Communications Design, MS & MFA, has practiced as an art therapist in several areas, in education, learning disabilities and with troubled adolescents, incarcerated youth, as well as in a private practice. She was a graphic designer in publishing and corporate design and is a faculty member of Graduate Communications Design at Pratt Institute since 1985.  She is a longtime student of Jung’s work and incorporated it into her teaching.  Professor Lange has had her students come to ARAS and the Kristine Mann Library since 1985 to research symbols as they relate to corporate identity.

No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.

Nietzsche & Jung: Modern Human in Search of a Soul: The Healing Function of Art

FIRST TUESDAY FORUM

January 14, 2020
12:30 – 1:30 pm

 (Note: This is the 2nd Tues. in January)

Speakers: Yunus Tuncel, PhD and Maria Taveras, LCSW

 Jung’s ideas echo those of the Nietzsche of the same period in that every human being has an inner spark, a “creative fire” to work on. Jung, like the post-romantic Nietzsche, recognizes the potential artist in everyone and has similar ideas on artistic disposition. One such idea is to bring all oppositional traits and tendencies into some sensible unity, without effacing the uniqueness of those traits. One major conflict that Jung touches upon is the conflict between the longing for happiness and passion for artistic creation (see Modern Man in Search of a Soul); in Nietzsche, this corresponds to the conflict between self-preservation and culture-making. Nietzsche also acknowledges the conflict between creation and destruction, and the conflict between the herd instinct and “overhumanliness.” The artist, whether in Nietzsche or Jung, not only acknowledges these conflicts but also gives a form or a meaning to them in an artistic medium and the work of art created.  

     We will see how these works are small stops on life’s journey and the self-creation of the artist. Both Nietzsche and Jung see art as a forum for self-transformation and healing. In and through art we can deal with our problems and suffering and turn negative emotions into positive, uplifting ones. As he presents it in “The Healing Function of Art,” Jung sees great potential in art’s capacity to heal.

Yunus Tuncel is a co-founder of the Nietzsche Circle and is the Editor-in-Chief of its electronic journal, The Agonist. He is the author of Towards a Genealogy of Spectacle, Agon in Nietzsche and Emotion in Sports and the editor of Nietzsche and Transhumanism. 

Maria Taveras is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. She is also an artist who paints and sculpts archetypal images from her own dreams.  

No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.

A Jungian Aesthetic: Art, Active Imagination, and the Creative Process

FIRST TUESDAY FORUM

Tuesday, December 3, 2019
12:30 – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Maria Taveras, LCSW

A hundred years ago, in 1913, when Jung invented active imagination, a female voice from the unconscious said to him that what he was doing was art.  Jung disparaged this anima figure as “that aesthetic lady” and protested emphatically: “It is not art!”

In 20th century modern art, there was a famous Freudian aesthetic based on free association – surrealism.  Now in the 21st century, especially after the publication of Jung’s Red Book, and The Art of C.G. Jung, we have an opportunity, for the first time, to develop a Jungian aesthetic based on active imagination.  What exactly is the relation between art, active imagination, and the creative process?    

Note: This lecture is based on a program Maria Taveras gave at the Lunch Forum December 2018.

Maria Taveras, LCSW, is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City.
She is a supervising analyst on the faculty of the C.G. Institute of New York, and The C.G. Jung Foundation of Analytical Psychology.  She is also an award-winning sculptor and painter of “Dream Art.”  To explore the unconscious sources of creativity, she paints and sculpts images from her own dreams. She has received two Gradiva Awards from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis for her Dream Art. 

No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.

What Does Jung Mean in This Moment?

FIRST TUESDAY FORUM

Tuesday, November 5, 2019
12:30 – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Gary Brown, LCSW-R, LP

“In October, while I was alone on a journey, I was suddenly seized by an overpowering vision: I saw a monstrous flood covering all the northern and low-lying lands between the North Sea and the Alps. When it came up to Switzerland I saw that the mountains grew higher and higher to protect our country. I realized that a frightful catastrophe was in progress. I saw mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood.” C.G. Jung, MDR

Jung was born into the peaceful fin de siècle Europe, which became a bloody, war-torn world.  We humans managed to kill one hundred million of ourselves in the last century.  Jung had visions of blood running in the streets.

Jung’s method of “holding the opposites” enabled those fortunate enough to know of it to find the space beneath the conflicts and perhaps some meaningful peace.      

What the world needs now....!

Gary Brown, LCSW-R, LP, is a Jungian analyst in New York City. He is a supervising analyst on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and former vice president of The New York Association for Analytical Psychology. He is a member of the Foundation’s Continuing Education faculty and he was also past president of the Mid Hudson Jung Society. 

No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.